Nursing Homes for People of Color:
Still Segregated, Still Unequal

Tweet If Martin Luther King, Jr. was alive today, he would be 86. If he was like many elderly black Americans, he might well end up in a nursing home ranked lower in quality and with less well-trained nursing staff than a nursing home that many white Americans reside in. The facility would likely house

Writing About Alzheimer’s and Dementia Gets Complicated

Tweet Now that I have spent three days listening to expert neurologists, demographers, caregivers, and policy people talk about Alzheimer’s, I come away from the meeting with a sense that the story is complicated, and that I hope it is not reduced to talking points and sound bites. I didn’t feel that it was at

Alzheimer’s Disease Issues – Day 2:
Let’s Keep the Conversation Going

Tweet I spent today at an all day Alzheimer’s meeting, taking notes and tweeting. I am also exhausted. Many of you know that this is my 23rd consecutive day blogging here. There are a lot of pluses to posting every day, but on a night like this, where I have been focusing all day on

Alzheimer’s Disease Issues 2011 Fellowship Begins

Tweet I am in Washington at the National Press Foundation’s Alzheimer’s Disease Issues 2011 Fellowship with about 15 other journalists. The program runs through Wednesday. Today’s session was a half-day, with presentations by Richard Jackson, director of the Global Aging Initiative, Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Harry Johns, President and CEO of the

When Colorectal Cancer Screening is Too Much, Too Frequent, or Not Enough

Tweet No other disease advocacy group has built as effective an awareness campaign as the cancer societies. It has helped to build support for prevention, research, and treatments, but I wonder whether excess awareness could be contributing to the overuse of colorectal cancer screening in older people. They have been exposed to this message for