On Brian Williams and You and Your Doctor’s Memory

Tweet Guest post by Blair Bolles Memories are back in the news these days. Folks are lambasting NBC’s Nightly News Anchor, Brian Williams, as a Pinocchio, building up a record of having led a more exciting life than truth allows. Williams blames the error on a faulty memory, conflating events, but his apology was more

Seeing Your Doctor for Prevention,
Treating On Your Own: A Report from the Field

Tweet First off, let me be clear: what I report below I am not recommending. My first obligation is to my readers. Also, I am grateful to Brooke Binkowski, a stellar journalist-friend, who spontaneously emailed me this story this morning. It arrived in my inbox amid a heated social-media discussion about who the real villains are in

Nursing Homes for People of Color:
Still Segregated, Still Unequal

Tweet If Martin Luther King, Jr. was alive today, he would be 86. If he was like many elderly black Americans, he might well end up in a nursing home ranked lower in quality and with less well-trained nursing staff than a nursing home that many white Americans reside in. The facility would likely house

2014 Drug Issues: Where’s the Data, Product Hopping, Inappropriate Use, and What’s Come and Gone

Tweet For 2015, I’d love to see headway in clamping down on drugs that don’t work, tighter regulation of inappropriate drug marketing, and more open data and transparency from industry. Is it pie-in-the-sky? Maybe. But let’s work towards it. Patients need to be skeptical before pushing for a prescription or filling it. I’d urge you to search

Don’t Be Too Quick to Diagnose Yourself

Tweet Learning all you can to manage your health is clearly a good thing. Today we have more at our disposal to learn a huge amount about our health status, how to intervene to avoid a crisis, and optimize our health. But recently, I’ve seen friends make assessments of their health status that were dead

In Stunning Reversal, Unnecessary “Preventive” Mastectomies Are Surging in Young White Women with Insurance

Tweet I remember the first time that I heard about an unexpected rise in unnecessary mastectomies in young white women, who were privately insured. About five years ago, I was at the largest cancer meeting of the year, the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Speakers raised the issue; they’d speculate why;

A Second Look at the European Randomised Study Of
Screening For Prostate Cancer

Tweet Last week, The Lancet published 13-year follow-up results from the European Randomised study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), an international trial of PSA testing in seven countries (the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland). (Unfortunately, the complete study is behind a paywall.) The core finding reported was that after 13 years

4 Short Summer Reads: Concussion in Girls, Adult Diapers,
Gay Conversion Therapy with Electric Shock, and Chronic Pain

Tweet We’re halfway through the summer, when perhaps you have more time for reading and considering new ideas. I want to draw readers’ attention to four issues that sharpen the focus on overlooked population groups that should be part and parcel of patient-centered research and care. Presented in no particular rank order, I think that

At Last, Sexual Orientation Question is Added
To CDC’s Youth Risk Factor Behavior Survey

Tweet On the heels of LGBT Pride events last weekend, PatientPOV.org takes a look at efforts to include LGBT individuals in health services research, health planning, and systems of care. Efforts to reduce disparities did not end with the defeat of the Defense of Marriage Act, bans on gay conversion therapy, and transgender individuals coming