Seven Days in November:
Healthcare and the Road Ahead

As if an acrimonious campaign and stunning election were not enough, the past seven days have been rife with anxiety and fear that the Republic is crumbling. In healthcare, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Medicare, Medicaid–and you name it–many federal entitlements– are at risk of evisceration, with nothing substantive to replace it intended or on the drawing board. How will people get and afford healthcare under this order with no safety net?

Today, PatientPOV returns to its roots and gets back to the work of uncovering the gaps between the powers that be and the people. Any of us could be patients and caregivers at some point in our lives. Some of us have had terrible illnesses, been taken up with caregiving, and as a result, experienced economic hardships and disruption in work.

In the past few days, I began to talk with people in red states who are worried about the future of healthcare as the new order frames it. It’s premature to put it into a story, but I will write about it soon.

During the campaign, Trump didn’t have much of a health plan unless you want to call promoting health savings accounts a platform. But health savings accounts are largely limited to people with disposable incomes who can shelter money for health expenses. It’s not insurance at all. Clearly, health savings accounts were the bare minimum that alone, would not fly, post-election.

In the last seven days, Trump and Republican leaders sure have amplified their intentions. Now we are hearing about the dismantling of popular programs that have insured millions or provided a a safety net for many others. It’s overwhelming to consider the programs Trump and Republican leaders are earmarking for extinction. But I hope to air here people’s discontent about the proposed overhaul of healthcare as we know it.

If you’ve got something to say about this, please put it in the comments below. To quote Yogi: “It’s not over till it’s over.” It’s been seven days. Stand up now. Get ready for the long haul. It’s the only way forward.

 

5 Fun Facts About the New York Health Insurance Marketplace AKA The New York State of Health

776px-Map_of_New_York_NAI had the pleasure of hearing Elizabeth R. Benjamin, MSPH, JD, Vice President, Health Initiatives, Community Service Society, of New York, at a presentation she gave on the new insurance marketplace for the New York Chapter of the Association of Healthcare Journalists tonight.

Sorting through the changes is daunting, but I thought 5 facts she discussed show what might set New York State apart from many other states:

  1. Thus far, New York State has enrolled approximately one-third of the nation’s enrollees. According to Benjamin, 100,881 New Yorkers have enrolled of approximately 300,000 across the United States.
  2. New Yorkers have been accustomed to choice in health coverage, but on one issue, out of network coverage, none is allowed. Advocates are pressing to change that.
  3. As the marketplace launches, premiums in New York State have dropped by 53%.
  4. New York State has a more streamlined approach to getting financial help than many other states. If you are eligible for financial help, the marketplace will determine your eligibility early in the enrollment process. You do not need to apply for financial help separately.
  5. As of Dec. 12, two carriers (United and Empire) had not invoiced people who signed up, but both promise to bill people next week. Given that Dec. 31 is the deadline for paying your invoice, it’s making lots of people jumpy.

Additional Resources

If you are still looking to enroll, many resources are available, including navigators to help you select your plan. Check out these resources:

New York State of Health: www.nystateofhealth.ny.gov

Community Health Advocates: www.communityhealthadvocates.org

            For enrollment help, call 1-888-614-5400  tollfree.

Email: enroll@cssmy.org

Small Business Assistance Program: www.sbapny.org

Health Care for All New York: www.hcfany.org

You can also keep informed about the law, timetable, and changes here.

Find coverage: www.healthcare.gov

It’s been a bumpy ride. Do you think the marketplace will work in New York? Have your say in the comments below.